ASK A DOC

Ask a question and read responses to questions from other patients.

Ask a Doctor2018-06-12T20:20:45+00:00
If you provide an email (optional) you will receive a message once your question is answered.

About 15 years ago I had a T.R.U.E. allergen patch test performed at a dermatology office. I tested positive to thiourea, colophony, and p-teet-butylphenol formaldehyde resin. I wonder if an updated test would be beneficial to me because of continuous itchy spots on the back side of my neck. The rashes quickly clear up with hydrocortisone cream, but return after a few weeks to days later. I’m also wondering if the rashes are food related.
July 12, 2018

Thank you for your question.  The T.R.U.E test is still one of the best ways to determine skin contact allergens.  Allergic contact dermatitis is the same allergic pathway as poison ivy dermatitis.  These eruptions often present with chronic or recurrent eczema like patches.  Allergic contact dermatitis and other eczematous eruptions are unlikely to be triggered by foods.  Once allergies have developed, it is important to contiue to avoid the allergen as any new exposure can reactivate the allergic contact dermatitis.  Since it has been several years since your last patch testing, it is possible you may have developed new sensitivities to different preservatives in skin care products or other chemicals.     Because you report the rash resolves quickly with mild topical steroids, you may have more of an irritant reaction rather than a true allergy.  The best recommendation would be to make an appointment with one of our dermatologists to examine the rash when the condition is flared.

Elizabeth B. W. Anderson, MD

Board Certified Dermatologist

Knoxville Institute of Dermatology

www.dermatologyknoxville.com

Do you take Medicare patients? I am 65 yr old woman. Aging skin bumps are my issues with itchy, rough, scaly things that I’d like to have frozen or removed.
July 12, 2018

At Knoxville Institute of Dermatology we take most insurance plans, including Medicare.    The most common aging skin lesion is a seborrheic keratosis.  These are benign warty growth that can come on the face, trunk, and extremities.  Unless the lesions show signs of inflammation, they are often considered cosmetic by most insurance plans.  Our offices in Knoxville, Lenoir City, and Tellico Village have reasonable cosmetic removal prices if you are interested in treating these lesions.  All of our providers are capable of treating seborrheic keratosis.

Elizabeth B. W. Anderson, MD

Board Certified Dermatologist

Knoxville Institute of Dermatology

www.dermatologyknoxville.com

Hey I have a quick question concerning my forearm.. I have small patches of small bumps kind of pinkish… I started with a small little patch about two months ago but they seem to be spreading more through my forearms… they are very itchy especially when it get hot I scratch them a little and they start to bleed an scab… wondering if I could send you a picture to give you a better understanding of what I mean.. I tried googling some images see if I could find something similar and know what it’s called but I guess the closest thing I could find in my opinion was keratosis pilaris But not so sure it looks the same so if you could maybe email me back to send a picture and see what you think that would be greatly appreciated! Thank you in advance!
July 12, 2018

Thank you for your question.  Small, rough bumps on the arms can be a sign of keratosis pilaris, which is a hereditary skin condition.  In keratosis pilaris, dead skin can accumulate around the openings of hair follicles and give a rough chicken skin texture.  Occasionally the follicles can become inflamed or itchy, but most often the condition is asymptomatic.  Because your eruption is new onset, rather that something you have had for year, there are many other conditions that could also be considered.  At Knoxville Institute of Dermatology, our providers are able to diagnosis and treat keratosis pilaris as well other skin conditions.  I recommend you call the Knoxville office for an appointment either in Knoxville, Lenoir City, or Tellico Village offices.

Elizabeth B. W. Anderson, MD

Board Certified Dermatologist

Knoxville Institute of Dermatology

www.dermatologyknoxville.com

 

I have a new mole that seems to have appeared overnight. I was wondering if I should be concerned? I have been spending a lot of time in the sun this summer.
July 12, 2018

Thank you for your question.  The development of a new mole can be a concerning change on the skin.  It is unusual to get new moles after around age 35.  A new flat mole that is changing color, border, and size can be sign of a melanoma skin cancer.  A new pink mole that is bleeding can be concerning for a basal cell carcinoma.  At Knoxville Institute of Dermatology, all of our providers are skilled at evaluating and treating a concerning skin lesion.  I recommend you call the office for an appointment to have the lesion checked.

Elizabeth B.W. Anderson, MD

Board Certified Dermatologist

Knoxville Institute of Dermatology

www.dermatologyknoxville.com

 

Does your medical practice provide skin tests for gluten or lactose?
June 29, 2018

Than you for your question! We are able to test for rashes that are associated with gluten sensitivities.  The rash associated with this sensitivity is called Dermatitis Herpetiformis. We would need to evaluate this rash in the office, and submit a biopsy for a more definitive answer. We have offices in Lenoir City, Knoxville, and Tellico Village.  Please call the office at 865-450-9361 to make an appointment.

— Callyn Henry, PA-C ( Staff Physician Assistant, Knoxville Institute of Dermatology)

Page 1 of 35 1 2 3 4 5 6 »