Project Description

The Providers at Knoxville Institute of Dermatology are experts in the diagnosis and treatment of eczema. Eczema, often referred to as dermatitis or atopic dermatitis, is the name for a group of conditions that cause the skin to become inflamed, red and itchy. Children often develop atopic dermatitis with patches appearing on the scalp, forehead and cheeks. It is important to understand the type of eczema as well as the triggers to formulate the best treatment plan in both children and adults. Contact our office for an evaluation if you or your child are struggling with eczema.

What is dermatitis?

Dermatitis refers to a group of inflammatory conditions. It affects the outer layer of the skin, the epidermis. Dermatitis affects about one in every five people at some time in their lives. It results from a variety of different causes and has various patterns. The terms dermatitis and eczema are often used interchangeably. In some cases the term eczematous dermatitis is used. Dermatitis can be acute or chronic or both.

  • Acute eczema (or dermatitis) refers to a rapidly evolving red rash which may be blistered and swollen.
  • Chronic eczema (or dermatitis) refers to a longstanding irritable area. It is often darker than the surrounding skin, thickened (lichenified) and much scratched.

An in-between state is known as subacute eczema. Psychological stresses can provoke or aggravate dermatitis, presumably by suppressing normal immune mechanisms.

What types of dermatitis are there?

  • Atopic dermatitis is particularly prevalent in children; inherited factors seem important, as there is nearly always a family history of dermatitis or asthma.
  • Irritant contact dermatitis is provoked by handling water, detergents, solvents or harsh chemicals, and by friction. Irritants cause more trouble in those who have a tendency to atopic dermatitis.
  • Allergic contact dermatitis is due to skin contact with substances that most people don’t react to: most commonly nickel, perfume, rubber, hair dye or preservatives. A dermatologist my identify the responsible agent by patch testing.
  • Dry skin: especially on the lower legs, may cause asteatotic dermatitis, also called eczema craquele.
  • Nummular dermatitis (also called ‘discoid eczema’) may be set off initially by an injury to the skin: scattered coin-shaped irritable patches persist for a few months.
  • Seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff are due to irritation from toxic substances produced by malassezia yeasts that live on the scalp, face and sometimes elsewhere.
  • Infective dermatitis seems to be provoked by impetigo (bacterial infection) or fungal infection.
  • Stasis dermatitis arises on the lower legs of the elderly, due to swelling and poorly functioning leg veins.

What are treatments for dermatitis?

An important aspect of treatment is to identify and tackle any contributing factors (see above).

  • Bathing Bathe using lukewarm water. Replace standard soap with a substitute such as a mild detergent soap-free cleanser: your dermatologist can advise you.
  • Clothing Wear soft smooth cool clothes; coarse fibers (wool or synthetic) are best avoided (microfine merino wool may be suitable)
  • Irritants Protect your skin from dust, water, solvents, detergents, injury.
  • Emollients Apply an emollient liberally and often, particularly after bathing, and when itchy. Ask your doctor or dermatologist to recommend some to try; avoid perfumed products when possible.
  • Topical steroids Apply a topical steroid cream or ointment to the itchy patches for a 5 to 15 day course. A suitable one will be prescribed by your doctor or dermatologist. Make sure you understand when and where to apply it, and how often you may repeat the course. Steroids should usually be applied once or twice daily to the red and itchy areas only. Sometimes two or more topical steroids will be supplied, either for different parts of the body, or for differing grades of dermatitis.
  • Antibiotics Your doctor may recommend antibiotics if infection is complicating or causing the dermatitis. The infection is most often with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes.
  • Antihistamines Antihistamine tablets may help reduce the itch, and are particularly useful at night.
  • Other treatments Systemic treatments and phototherapy may also be recommended for severe cases.

What is the best long-term control?

Dermatitis is often a long-term problem. When you notice your skin getting dry, moisturize your skin again and carefully avoid the use of soap. If the itchy rash returns, use both the moisturizer and the steroid cream or ointment. If it fails to improve within two weeks, see your doctor for further advice.

WHAT OUR PATIENTS SAY

I was so pleased with everything. Dr. Wright is such a nice person and wonderful doctor. Brittany was so pleasant and friendly. They offer blankets and pillows and make sure throughout the entire procedure that you are comfortable and that you are as pain free as possible. Everything went well and they go out of their way to make it so.
Marianne D.

I had a recurring dermatological condition for several and a series of dermatologists as a result. And yet until I met Dr. Wright, my condition remained undiagnosed and it turned out to be potentially life-threatening. I am so fortunate to have found him and I would not go to anyone else and recommend him often.

Donald B.

What a great experience! I was greeted promptly and courteously by the front desk staff. I was seen almost immediately and treated with care and concern by both Devon and Dr. Wright. I will certainly make KID my home for dermatology and would highly recommend them to everyone.

Penny F.

Dr. Adam Wright took his time to explain the procedure, perform the surgery, and teach how to care for wound afterwards. I have found few physicians take such time with their patients and I am a registered nurse.

Laurie J.
Dr. Wright listens, answers questions, gives understandable explanations, presents options. I consider him an outstanding physician, and his nurse is also excellent. The use of technology is also very good. BTW, my rating on the facility pertains to the Lenoir City location. I would rate the Knoxville location Excellent.
Jane R.
I tend to avoid doctors if I can. And I have never left a review for any medical person or facility. But Dr. Wright made some uncomfortable symptoms easy to discuss and then was able to offer excellent options for resolving those issues. I would send anyone I care about to see him for any sort of skin-related complaint. He is the best!
Sean M.

This was my first visit with Knoxville Institute of Dermatology, and my first visit with Dr. Wright. Dr. Wright seems like a very knowledgeable, caring doctor, who explains things well, and seems to care very much for his patients. I already have an appointment in a year to see Dr. Wright again for a check up. Since I live in Crossville it is also much more convenient to be able to see him at the Lenoir City office.

Barry S.
Thank you for the convenience of visiting this office in Lenoir City rather than going out of town. I received a thorough examination and treatment. I received reference material about the condition to read at home. Dr. Wright took the time to welcome me back and offer to help anytime. Who does that? I appreciate all of this. I have found myself a new dermatology center!
William W.

July: Wart Awareness Month

July 16th, 2019|0 Comments

WART ARE THOSE?! We are amid the peak season for the spread of non-genital warts (verrucae). In order to raise awareness, the National Verruca Foundation (NVF) has designated July as Wart Awareness Month. Warts are [...]

Welcome Kegan Reilly, PA-C!

June 20th, 2019|0 Comments

Kegan graduated with honors in 2008 from the United States Military Academy at West Point, with his B.S. in Mathematical Sciences. After graduating from West Point, he was commissioned into the United States Army where [...]

Farewell, Dr. Hendrick!

May 30th, 2019|0 Comments

It is with mixed emotions, we announce the departure of Dr. Sophia J. Hendrick. Aside from being East Tennessee's only board-certified pediatric dermatologist, Dr. Hendrick has also become our mentor, family, and friend. We could [...]

Rosacea Awareness Month!

March 29th, 2019|0 Comments

April is Rosacea Awareness Month.  According to the National Rosacea Society, the goal of Rosacea Awareness Month is to spread public education on this disease so that more people who may have rosacea seek medical [...]

Dermatology Is More Than Skin Deep

February 7th, 2019|0 Comments

What You Need To Know About Your Body's Largest Organ Dermatology, the study of diseases of the skin—the human body’s largest organ--is both misunderstood and underrated. Even some physicians in other specialties think it’s “easy,” [...]

MAKE AN APPOINTMENT

We’re excited to work with you, find a solution to your skin care needs and give you the results you deserve. Fill out the form below and someone will contact shortly to schedule your appointment.